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2011 Range Rover Gets New Greener Diesel Engine

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A new greener 4.4-liter turbodiesel V8 engine aimed primarily at European customers is the main new feature of the 2011 Range Rover line which also gets new 8-speed transmission and equipment upgrades.

The LR-TDV8 4.4-liter with parallel sequential turbocharging replaces the old LR-TDV8 3.6-liter and is unique to the Range Rover.

The all-new LR-TDV8 combines superior power and massive torque with unparalleled levels of refinement. Despite the extra performance, this V8 engine is cleaner too, delivering even lower fuel consumption and CO2 emissions than its predecessor. The combined cycle fuel consumption of the new LR-TDV8 4.4-liter is 30.1mpg
UK (25 mpg U.S.), making this the first Range Rover ever to better 30mpg.
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With 313PS and 700Nm torque, the Range Rover's new powertrain reduces CO2 emissions by an impressive 14 percent from 294g/km to 253g/km. The new diesel engine is helped in this respect by its marriage to a new, electronically controlled, ZF 8HP70, 8-speed automatic. This combination is enough to catapult the Range Rover from rest to 60mph in a mere 7.5 seconds and complete the 50mph-70mph dash in just 4.0 seconds while the top speed increases from 125mph to 130mph.
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ZF 8HP70 automatic gearbox partners the 4.4-liter LR-TDV8
The new ZF 8HP70 8-speed transmission is tuned to take advantage of the LR-TDV8’s low end torque with torque converter lock-up being selected as early as possible to reduce slip and energy loss. The wider ratio spread, tall overdriven top gear and the fact that no more than two internal clutches are open at any one time all contribute to improved fuel economy and emissions.

Transmission Idle Control disengages 70 percent of the drive when the vehicle is stationary and the engine is idling in Drive, significantly reducing consumption in the urban cycle. In cold conditions, the transmission selects a lower gear to promote fast warm up and get the engine up to its efficient operating temperature as soon as possible.

Driver controls include steering wheel-mounted paddle-shift as standard enabling the driver to take control of gear shifting manually. The CommandShift lever is replaced by a rotary knob for selecting park, reverse, neutral, drive or sport modes, the last of these optimising the gearbox response times for maximum acceleration, improved response and sharper upshifts. The selector knob is flush with the centre console when the ignition is switched off, rising up when it is switched on. To avoid confusion, the Terrain Response® Rotary Switch is replaced by a new Terrain Response® Optimisation Switch.

For 2011, the Range Rover retains the same class-leading 5.0-liter LR-V8, supercharged petrol engine married to the ZF HP28 6-speed automatic transmission introduced in 2010. Developing 510PS and 625Nm torque the Supercharged LR-V8 will take the Range Rover from 0-60mph in 5.9 seconds and remains the flagship model.

Terrain Response® Enhancements
The 2011 Range Rover is further enhanced by improvements to the Terrain Response® system in the form of Hill Start Assist and Gradient Acceleration Control. Hill Start Assist retains the initial driver-generated brake pressure long enough for the foot to move from brake pedal to throttle, without the car rolling backwards. Gradient Acceleration Control is designed to provide safety cover on severe gradients when the driver does not have Hill Descent Control engaged.

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